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"How I Became a Fan" - please post!
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dodgerblue6



Joined: 10 Aug 2005
Posts: 12445
Location: San Diego CA - deep in the heart of SoCal

PostPosted: Wed 8/10/05 9:45 am    Post subject: "How I Became a Fan" - please post! Reply with quote

Okay let's start this one off. I know this will be a repeat for some of you, so please share your story AGAIN, so we can all get re-acquainted.

No doubt there are going to be some new posters checking in that don't know the rest of us here, so let's just all tell just how it was that we became a fan of the game and encourage new members to do the same. I know that from reading others' stories in the past, we all came to love baseball at various points in our lives and through many different introductions to the grand old game.

I will repeat my story and for those who have heard it before, stop reading now, or bear with me. LOL

I was born in San Diego, California, just two months after the Dodgers won their first World Series on the west coast. They moved to California from Brooklyn in 1958 and won the W.S. against the Chicago White Sox the next year, in October, 1959. Many years later, those of you who have heard me talk about this know that I refer to my "blue eyes and blue blood" being developed at that time, and I've often said that my mom must have felt the baby kick when the last out was made!

Back then, there were only two major league teams on the west coast, the Dodgers and the Giants. For many decades the PCL (Pacific Coast League) was a steady supplier of talent to the majors. For example, Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox got his start with the minor league San Diego Padres in the 1930s. (Incidentally, Ted was born and raised in my neighborhood of San Diego, and the closest park to me, where he learned to play baseball, features a diamond named Ted Williams Field--albeit a very modest one.) The Padres were not to become a major league franchise until the expansion year of 1969, and thus the Dodgers were the closest MLB team to us, 120 miles to the north.

Like millions of other baseball aficionados, my dad became a big fan of Sandy Koufax in the mid-1960s when Sandy and Don Drysdale established the Dodgers as the premiere pitching-based team of the National League. It was at this time, the last reigning days when baseball was king of all sports in America, that I learned the very basic rules of the game. By the time I was nine years old, I had completely dumped playing with dolls for collecting baseball cards. That year, 1969, was the same year that the Padres played their first year in the National League. I was playing Bobbysox softball here in S.D., learning more and more about the mechanics of the game, and attended my first MLB game that same year at San Diego Stadium. Back in those days the teams gave out some pretty good freebies for kids under 14--one I remember was a wooden bat with the Padres' insignia on it. We went to several games every season. I still remember San Diego Stadium when it was being built in the late 1960s, Dad driving us by the job site in Mission Valley (about three miles from home), and the early days saw some terrible Padres teams (not so different from the latter days!) with very small crowds in attendance. Both my mom and dad were baseball fans, but it was Dad who taught me how to keep score, how to follow the lineup and why players batted where they did, and one of the most important rules of the game, "never leave before the last out is made." He always brought a radio with us to the game to listen to the commentators. Oh, those days! You could bring almost any kind of food or drink into the game; coolers were even allowed. An entire family could attend cheap because you really only had to purchase the tickets. Over the next several years I was just a casual fan of sorts who liked both the Dodgers and Padres, until 1974. That was the magical year that I became transfixed over a certain first baseman, one Steven Patrick Garvey, who propelled the Dodgers to their first World Series in eight seasons, and was named National League MVP that year. Over the next few years I gave over my heart and soul to the team. The great Dodger infield, the longest-running in all of MLB history, was together for that same time frame (1973-1981)--Garvey, Ron Cey, Davey Lopes, and Bill Russell. In 1977, Tommy Lasorda began his first year of 20 seasons managing the team.

It was around this time that I discovered the sheer joy of listening to Vin Scully, voice of the Dodgers since 1950, and I began to learn more and more about baseball lore, tradition, and its great rivalries. I became interested in the Dodgers' history in Brooklyn as well as in L.A. I studied the box scores faithfully; I looked at the standings daily. I perused two newspapers on a regular basis, and I began to collect memorabilia as often as I could. I started reading the great baseball books, starting with "The Boys of Summer." I began to really study the game, become familiar with the statistics, the records, the deep and rich history of all the teams and great players in different eras. I also attended my first game at Dodger Stadium during this time frame. I thought I had stepped into heaven when I first looked out onto, and beyond, that beautiful field at Chavez Ravine on a bright sunny afternoon when the Dodgers hosted the Padres in a SCHEDULED doubleheader--a novelty of sorts that's died out over the years.

The late 1970s and early 1980s saw the Dodgers in three World Series over a five-year span, all against the Yankees, with the Bums winning only the last one, in 1981. During those years I was a young and enthusiastic fan, just out of high school. I was still living at home and money meant nothing to me beyond spending cash. I didn't have a car at the time, and I thought nothing of taking a train, on the spur of the moment, to L.A. and Dodger Stadium for the World Series, by myself, without a ticket in hand, and forking over $100 to a scalper for the worst seat in the house. "Being there was everything", as Vin says, and it was all about my passion for the blue. I may have attended games alone, but when you're there with 55,000 wild fans you can hardly not consider yourself among friends and family. And of course I attended all the games here in S.D. where the opposition's fans sometimes outnumbered Padres fans, Dodger games being among those occasions. When I couldn't be at a ballpark, I spent many late nights staying up in my bedroom, reading while I was listening to the great Mr. Scully call many Dodger late-inning comebacks, or recount the magic of Fernandomania in 1981, and finally, that same season culminating in my team beating the Yankees at last. In those pre-cable network days--even regular cable TV was a pretty new concept back then--Dodger road games were televised on the L.A. TV station I could watch in S.D., but Dodger baseball at Chavez Ravine could be heard only on the Dodgers' radio network. And so I listened to it on an L.A. station which crackled and faded from time to time, and often was interfered with from the signals of stations in Mexico. Thus, you'd sometimes hear, "Cey rounds third and ..." (mariachi music)..."next up is Dusty Baker..."

If only there'd been the Internet in those days!

In the 1980s I "grew up", so to speak. Moved out, got my own apartment, started a long-running job, had a long-time boyfriend. Sometime along the way, life's little problems got in the way and distracted me from the beautiful game I loved so much. I sleepwalked through the 1988 season, hardly knowing who was starting at each position for the Dodgers. I endured a painful breakup with my boyfriend of six years just before the 1988 playoffs began. Then my Dodgers, who weren't given a chance in hell vs. the mighty N.Y. Mets in the NL playoffs, became my only salvation. Miraculously, they won, and ended up in the World Series again. An injured Kirk Gibson stepped up to the plate in the ninth inning with the Dodgers trailing 4-3, and belted his now-classic blast, but was barely able to limp around the basepaths. It was euphoria again.

I was "back." At that point, I vowed to never again let real life get in the way of baseball!

Years later, I saw a videotape in which Gibson described--eerily, as if describing my life at the time--the home run he hit off Dennis Eckersley. "You look around the stands and you see that temporarily, everyone had forgotten about their problems. Nobody in the stands that night was thinking about anything going on wrong in their lives--we were all happy."

The last 17 years have been lean ones for the Dodgers.
They've made the playoffs three times--most recently winning the N.L. West last year--and finally broke the drought of 16 years without a postseason victory last October. There have been bright spots, such as the organization producing an unprecedented five straight National League Rookies of the Year from 1992 through 1996. Then the bomb was dropped, in 1998, when the Fox group bought the team and began shuffling some players while rewarding others with outrageously large contracts. In the process, the five straight ROYs were gone, although Hideo Nomo did return to the team a couple of years back. Just prior to the team being sold, Tommy Lasorda retired as their two-decade long manager, due to health reasons. The Dodgers no longer seemed to be the "family" organization they had been promoted as for so long.

Two years ago, my dad died, the man who I credit with passing down the love for the game to me long ago, some 40 years or so. But I'm doing my part in instilling it in my nephews, who despite being Padres fans, have learned to appreciate the legacy of other teams, such as the Dodgers. I've made sure that they know about the players and teams that had an impact on the game long before they were born, and of the contributions made by many of those.

In the offseason of 2003-04, the Dodgers were sold by Fox/Newscorp. to a Boston real estate developer named Frank McCourt. We were told that the McCourt group would honor Dodger tradition, restore pride, treat the fans with respect. And the jury is still out on this after 1- 1/2 seasons, although there seems to be an honest effort to improve in some areas, while other decisions made by the organization are clearly questionable to long-time fans. But we were told a lot of that six years ago when the O'Malley family first sold the team after owning it for half a century.

Still, whether they finish in first or last, the game is still baseball, and you gotta love it. Hope springs eternal.

That's my story. Anyone else? How did you learn about baseball? Who taught you? And what team earned your undying devotion?

Any special memories you recall over others?
I'm waiting to hear.
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"The Dodgers have always occupied an enormous place in the history of the game. If the Yankees are the most successful team in baseball history, the Dodgers are the most essential. Their legacy is unique."

-Baseball Hall of Fame
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Sandi
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PostPosted: Thu 8/11/05 3:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have to thank a casual friend for introducing me to Cardinals baseball. Nobody in my family was ever remotely interested in sports. My first game was in April of 1996, against the Braves. It was a cold and miserable Saturday afternoon. The Cardinals didn't win. I really only agreed to go with this friend because it was something new to do, and an excuse to leave the house (still lived at home with parents at that point in my life.) When the game was over, my friend asked me if I'd like to go again sometime, and I said, "Sure, if we can go on a warmer day."

So in the next few years, we went to more games, and I startd to learn about the game, the players, and then about a little thing called the standings. Just so happened we had ordered tickets way in advance to a game on September 21, 2000 when the Cardinals clinched the Division. Playoff fever caught hold, and I then learned about camping out for post-season tickets. What fun that was! I attended a couple games of the 2000 NLCS vs. the Mets, and the Cards lost both of them. Of course, I had to return my W.S. tickets for a refund because the Mets finished us off in NY.

In 2001, and with each following year, my passion for the Cardinals has increased immensely. I consider myself a little bit crazed about it at this point.

I made several good friends in 2000 during the playoff ticket campout(s) and we have stayed in touch ever since. That's really been one of the best things about Cardinals baseball to me, the friends I have made because of it. In fact, we all went in together just this year and purchased a commemorative brick paver for the new Cardinals ballpark which will open next season. It reads, "Camping out for W.S. tickets leads to good friends." And then we listed our names.

My most recent "craze" has been a desire to see the Cardinals play in every major league ballpark. Traveling was my first passion, and I've learned to combine it with the Cardinals to achieve the best of both worlds. That's how I came to meet our moderator(s) last September, during a visit to PETCO Park and Dodger Stadium. This year my baseball trip took me to Toronto and the Skydome (currently called the Rogers Center, but I like Skydome better. Very Happy ) Saw all three games of the series, and the Cardinals took 1 out of 3. Chris Carpenter pitched a 1-hit shutout! And the one hit that the Jays got that night was so close to being foul... oh, it was so close! After Toronto, took a little side trip to Cooperstown, NY and the Baseball Hall of Fame. That was the highlight of the whole trip. So glad I went there and look forward to going back sometime.

Can't wait to see the baseball schedule for 2006 so I can plan the next ballpark visit. Also hoping to spend a long weekend in Jupiter, FL sometime in late February for a spring training game or two.

Well, that's about it for me... Next! Cool
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Francine
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PostPosted: Thu 8/11/05 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's great to have the site back, thanks Linda!

How did I become a fan? Ok, I guess I was about 9 or 10 and my cousin came to saty with us for the summer. She was a Mets fan and I started watching the games with her every day. I fell madly in love with Tim Foli, their rookie SS. I was going to marry him Laughing I loved my Mets and two of my fondest memories of my father are when he took me to Shea stadium to see the Mets (but the game was rained out Crying or Very sad ) and when he took me to the Monmouth Mall to see a few of the players. They had a amake up game so they never appeared Crying or Very sad but we got mini bats with signatures (machine signed) and mine was Tug McGraw. I treasured that bat. Oddly enough, and I'm very upset by this, I lost my bat. Long story and it upsets me...........

I became a Phillies fan after I married my husband. He was born and raised in Philadelphia and I never thought I'd ever be a Phillies fan, after all I loved my Mets! But, I fell in love with them but I will always hold the mets dear in my heart!

I'm Francine (my real name,lol) I used to be mpnut. I decided to use my real name because I have been having a problem using mpnut since I got kicked off another board,lol

Anyway, I' a Phillies fan, from NJ. I'm married and the proud mother of two kids (daughter 16 and son 13), I work in a supermarket as a cashier trainer and in customer service (been there over 27 years, it has been my first and only job,lol) I'm a big Mark Portugal fan (don't laugh please) and I enjoy collecting all his cards and memorablila as he is now retired. My favroite players present are: Carlos Silva (Twins), Andy Pettitte (astros), Johnny Damon (Red Sox) and Pat Burrell (Phillies ofcourse,lol)

Ok, that's me. who's next? Princess??????????????


Last edited by Francine on Fri 8/12/05 8:42 pm; edited 1 time in total
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dodgerblue6



Joined: 10 Aug 2005
Posts: 12445
Location: San Diego CA - deep in the heart of SoCal

PostPosted: Fri 8/12/05 8:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for your stories again. Francine (formerly mpnut), I remember on the old board you said you got married around the time of the 1986 World Series with the Mets and the Red Sox, right?

Please, everyone else, share with us. I love reading how we all came to love the game even though from so many diverse backgrounds!

What you each individually bring to this board is unique because of your own experience.
_________________
"The Dodgers have always occupied an enormous place in the history of the game. If the Yankees are the most successful team in baseball history, the Dodgers are the most essential. Their legacy is unique."

-Baseball Hall of Fame
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DianaPrince
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PostPosted: Fri 8/12/05 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't really have a story about how I became a fan because I don't remember not being a fan. One of my email addresses is actually phetusphan because that's how long I've loved the Phils. I came out of the womb this way.

But I guess I could discuss how I came to be at the point I am now. Until I was 18 I'd mostly just watched on TV and I'd only been to games twice. My father didn't have a lot of time to take us and it's hard taking 4 kids to a baseball game. He was always saying it was too expensive and there wasn't enough time. And this was when the most expensive tickets were $12. What would he say if he knew I was paying $40 a ticket? Laughing Also, before I was 18 I didn't watch that much because every time I watched or went to the game we lost. I figured I was a jinx so I avoided it in order to help the team. I didn't even watch the 93 World Series and that was one of the reasons.

But everything changed when I was 18. For one thing I didn't really have to rely on my parents to take my places. If I wanted to go I went. And my college was taking all of the freshman to a Phillies game as part of orientation. It was September 1, 1997 and we were playing the Yankees. Not only did we win but Curt Schilling got 16 strikeouts which, at the time, was a career high. And so the jinx was broken and off I went.

From 1998-2001 I went once or twice a month. I'd hang out a bit after the game at the player's lot and then I would meander on home. Then summer of 2002 three things happened. First, I got a new manager at work and my hours were drastically cut. I went from working seven days a week to two days a week. I had all this free time so I decided I was going to do what I wanted. Second, I discovered that the players actually stop and talk to the fans as they come in for the game in the afternoon. So I started getting to the ballpark around 1pm and I made my third important discovery. I could park for free! If I got there before the guards I didn't have to pay. Sweet!

It was during the summer of 2002 that I started getting to know Jason. Those of you who used the old old board may remember the evolution of that relationship from my game posts. And not here we are three years later and I'm getting hugs. How nice is that? Very Happy


Last edited by DianaPrince on Sat 9/24/05 10:31 pm; edited 1 time in total
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soxygirl18
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PostPosted: Fri 8/12/05 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

okay....hmmm....how I became a fan. Well, My parents were never big baseball fans, but being from New York my mom grew up watching the Mets. My dad had been a casual Red Sox fan but was never really into it. But starting in elementary school I was faced with a choice. The teachers would start making bets with each other in October and got everyone on one side or another. Of coarse my parents weren't going to start me off on the dark side, so I became a Red Sox supporter.

Baseball was never really an interest to me untill 2002 when I started to watch a few Red Sox games, just to see what was going on. The first game I watched I saw Johnny Damon make a catch in center and then fall over backwards, getting up and laughing at himself. I immediatly fell in love with JD. My real passion for the team then started in 2003. I followed the team closely all season and was then devestated along with everyone else with the tradgic outcome of the ALCS. I now knew what it felt like to be a true fan.

July of 2004 was when I went to my first game at Fenway Park. It was an experience that I will never forget. Despite the fact that we had some of the worst seats there, it was amazing. The atmosphere is like nowhere else, the passion and intensity of every game. Unfortunatly, tickets are very scarce and I could not attend another game that season.

I won't say too much about our 2004 season since we all know the story. It was amazing. I was in tears after game four, overcome with happiness and emotion for my team and all of red sox nation. I will never forget all the celebrations and the Rolling Rally. Millions of people lining the streets, climbing trees and jumping in the Charles River on a cold, rainy Novermber day, with all the players and staff riding through the street on duck boats. It was a pretty amazing sight.

2005 has been great so far. Fortunately, I was able to get tickets to four games this season back in January, with everything selling out hours after they went on sale. Becoming a Red Sox fan has been so great. I have learned so much about baseball and have a true passion for the sport. I have met many wonderful people and have had so many unforgettable experiences.

2005.....Let's do it again.
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suekamm
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PostPosted: Fri 8/12/05 4:56 pm    Post subject: How I started "Bleeding Dodger Blue" Reply with quote

Don't ask me how I came to be a Dodger fan, because I don't really remember Wink

I was in the tenth grade in 1955, and I remember betting the huge sum of 25 cents on the Dodgers to beat the Yankees. Those were the days in California, when- as Linda said - the Pacific Coast League was Baseball with a captial B. (For those who want know more about the PCL, look at [i]Runs, Hits, and an Era[/i] by Paul J. Zingg. The book, based on an exhibition that was at the Autry Museum of Western Heritage, is a good history of the old league and its teams.) For the next [many] years, I would look at game results and standings, but didn't really begin to follow the Dodgers until the late 70s or early 80s. My best friend (then) and I went to games at Dodger Stadium. At that time, you could only buy beer at a separate line, and my hazy memory of that first game says that it was so hot and muggy, the line stretched back to City Hall, and Davy Lopes won the game in the last of the ninth with a home run.

I built up my game attendance slowly, trying to get to every Sunday game and any game when there was a giveaway. I also became aware of 65 Roses, a charity dedicated to finding a cure for cystic fibrosis, when I bid on a plaque of Jerry Reuss's baseball cards in a silent auction. That has formed the nucleus of my memorabilia collection.

By 1993, I had a permanent full-time job, and decided it was time to get on the waiting list for season tickets. In October, my doctors discovered I had a small lump in my breast and I went in for a biopsy. (The surgery was originally scheduled for a Saturday morning, but when the doctor learned I had a ticket for the game that began at 1 p.m., we switched it to Friday.) When the doctor asked me to think of something pleasant when I went under the anesthesia, I visualized Mike Piazza hitting a home run. (He didn't hit one Saturday, but blasted two Sunday to help the Dodgers to a 12-3 victory of the Hated Vertically Advantaged and knock them out of the playoffs. Twisted Evil Shortly after I learned I had cancer, I got the call that I would get my season ticket, on the field level. As it turned out, the seat was behind my friend Drue! After a couple of years we both wound up in the front row, sitting in adjacent seats.

I got to know Raul Mondesi (sort of) during that time. (I'm very visible at the game - I have a hat covered with pins.) I'd yell at him, and he'd wiggle his glove or toss me a baseball. Since I can't catch very well, this meant he would come up and hand me the baseball.

In 2000, I was named "Truest of the Blue" as the outstanding Dodger fan that year. For some reason, my homepage is down, but keep trying http://suekamm.home.mindspring.com/index.htm which will tell you about my celebration.

Suffice to say, I still go to many Dodger games, although the people I knew on the field and elsewhere have for the most part moved on. I still wear my hat with lots of pins, but I'm no longer in the front row Crying or Very sad The "new" field level seats cost exactly [b]twice[/b] what I had been paying. Nevertheless, look for me in right field on the field level. I'm in the third row of yellow seats!
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dodgerblue6



Joined: 10 Aug 2005
Posts: 12445
Location: San Diego CA - deep in the heart of SoCal

PostPosted: Fri 8/12/05 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great stories, again! Thank you and keep them coming!

Soxygirl, thanks for sharing about what it's like in "border" territory. That must get interesting. Your description of the World Series celebration sounds like something we older Dodger fans can remember (minus the cold, of course)...although it's been 17 years since the last time. However, with all the pent-up frustration of having endured 86 years of coming up short for the Red Sox (some fans, that is--not you individually!), I can imagine it would have been even more crazy there.

Sue, my mom had just graduated from high school in the 1955 season and started college just before the World Series that year. (Mom's H.S. reunion is coming up in a few weeks by the way.) She said that all those years the Dodgers had been in the W.S. against the Yankees (seven times between 1941 and 1956), her family, friends, etc. were all pulling for the Dodgers even though they were 3000 miles away at the time.

It's strange to me to think that just a couple of years before I was born, the closest major league team to southern California was the Cardinals. Given how much our state has grown since then, getting five MLB teams within 11 years (1958-1969) and with me growing up knowing those five teams--that's just a very weird thought.

Another weird thing, the following year when Don Larsen piched the perfect game against the Dodgers in the 1956 World Series--some of her friends switched sides and went for the Yankees because Don Larsen had gone to their high school here in S.D. Aside from the great Ted Williams, he was the next big high school star in S.D. to make it big in the majors.

I loved your story about Mike Piazza, too. The "hated vertically advantaged", that's a good one! I'll have to remember that one. I will never forget that game on the last day of the 1993 season. Pride was all we had left (and the chance to finish at .500), with the NL Rookie of the Year leading the way. I honestly thought we would win the W.S. again within the next couple of years the way we kept bringing up ROYs...but it was not to be.
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"The Dodgers have always occupied an enormous place in the history of the game. If the Yankees are the most successful team in baseball history, the Dodgers are the most essential. Their legacy is unique."

-Baseball Hall of Fame
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Francine
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PostPosted: Fri 8/12/05 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dodgerblue6 wrote:
Thanks for your stories again. Francine (formerly mpnut), I remember on the old board you said you got married around the time of the 1986 World Series with the Mets and the Red Sox, right?

Please, everyone else, share with us. I love reading how we all came to love the game even though from so many diverse backgrounds!

What you each individually bring to this board is unique because of your own experience.


You have such a good memory,lol Yes I did get married Sept 6 1986 and while we were picking out our wedding photos, at the photographer's home, we watched the WS............it was a great series for a Mets fan (as I still was a die hard at the time, we just were married)..........I remember that well.
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teks tangibles
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PostPosted: Mon 8/15/05 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi all....

Francine let me know about this board and I think it's great that women fans from all over can share their love of baseball.....not just baseball players...though I do admit some are worth a second look.

I was born and raised in New Jersey and I was a Mets fan back in the 1960's. I'll never forget how I was brutally teased by Yankee fans (mostly boys) but got my revenge in 1969. It was awesome. I also (like Francine) loved Tim Foli...can't believe anyone else even remembers the guy. I adored Tom Seaver, Bud Harrelson, Tug McGraw...on and on.

In 1974 I moved to MA to go to college. Somewhere along the way I went to a game at Fenway Park and by the end of my college days I was a Red Sox fan. The minute I stepped in there I fell in love with the Pahk. It was nothing like Shea or Yankee stadium...so small..intimate. I used to go sit in the bleachers for a few bucks and could get in on the day of game. Not so any more. Over the years my love of baseball and the Red Sox has grown stronger and stronger. I have three teenage boys and I think I'm more into it than they are at this point. It never ceases to amaze them when I come up with some little known fact. I love stats. I love being at games in person and I've made it a priority to learn how one can get tickets to Red Sox games...and luckily I've been to many games. I was blessed to be in St. Louis at the World Series for game 4 last year. My now 15 year old son (almost 16) kept sending me links to Travelocity and I actually found a trip that was somewhat affordable...okay, cheaper than getting seats in small Fenway Park...so two of my sons and I made the journey and experienced a feeling that for me was like an out of body experience. I only regret that my oldest son (now 17...18 in a couple months) was not there with us.

My favorite player...obviously...is Jason Varitek. I didn't just jump on the Captain's band wagon. I've been a fan of his for most of his Red Sox career. He's having one heck of a season...as is the team...which makes me extremely happy. I am one person who absolutely does NOT want this team to trade Manny Ramirez. He is totally entertaining and can hit like no one I've ever seen. I also absolutely love our closer, Keith Foulke, who is now on the DL...rehabbing. He's had a lot of bad publicity around here....misunderstood IMHO...but I've met him briefly, when he was signing before the game and at a luncheon, and he just seems like a very down to earth and committed player (and okay....I looked twice).

Glad to be here and expand my baseball horizons. I find myself looking at scores that I would not have cared about in the past because I read about the games that other people are following....

Ruth
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DianaPrince
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PostPosted: Mon 8/15/05 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, teks, welcome to our humble home. Do you mind if I ask where in Jersey you grew up?
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teks tangibles
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PostPosted: Mon 8/15/05 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kristin....

Don't mind at all. I lived in Elizabeth, NJ until I was 13 and then we moved to the next town over...Union, NJ. It's pretty close to Newark airport which is extremely convenient when visiting my mom.

Ruth
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DianaPrince
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PostPosted: Mon 8/15/05 10:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gotcha...you lived north of me. I live outside of Trenton and I've lived here for 26 years. And at the moment I'm eyeing some properties in Robbinsville, NJ which is pretty much in the backyard of where I am now *s*

Last edited by DianaPrince on Mon 8/15/05 10:20 am; edited 1 time in total
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dodgerblue6



Joined: 10 Aug 2005
Posts: 12445
Location: San Diego CA - deep in the heart of SoCal

PostPosted: Mon 8/15/05 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello and welcome, Ruth! It is great to see another poster here who is able to remember many of the same things I do (I will use that description in lieu of "older", LOL!). I hope you will continue to feel at home here, and thank you, Francine, for recruiting! Razz

Side note, when I was in fifth grade in 1971 we were assigned pen pals to write to who were located in New Jersey. It seemed as far away as one could possibly be from me without crossing an ocean. Over the years I kept in touch off and on with my "pen pal" and even though it is much more sporadic now, I still have contact with her at least once or twice a year. She comes from a baseball family but I haven't been able to get her to join in here; I think she is just too busy. Her husband is baseball coach at St. John's U. and her dad was head coach at Seton Hall. She lives in Union, N.J. now. It's a small world...
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-Baseball Hall of Fame
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txbbfan
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PostPosted: Mon 8/15/05 10:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I became a fan when my husband took me to my first game between the Cardinals and Astros. This was back when the whole McGwire/Sosa HR chase was going on.
Lisa
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Sandi
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PostPosted: Mon 8/15/05 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome, Ruth! I have to ask you to expand a little about your experience in St. Louis last year for the World Series. Did you have game tickets before you got there or did you get them off the street? (Or maybe you didn't have tickets at all?) Did you stay downtown? It's great that you could be there to witness one of the greatest moments in your team's history. I think it's pretty incredible that the Cardinals decided to open up the stadium in the later innings of W.S. game 4 to let the people come in off the streets to be a part of the history.

I had a ticket to W.S. game 5, but obviously that game wasn't necessary. Whenever we see a W.S. in St. Louis again, I will definitely get a ticket for a game 4 or less! I just hope it's not quite so one-sided next time. Embarassed

Sandi
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teks tangibles
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PostPosted: Mon 8/15/05 11:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sandi....

First of all, let me say the vast majority of the Cardinal fans were great. There's always the ocassional "angry" fan, but in general, very nice crowd. We did not stay right in St. Louis. We were about 1/2 hour away, closer to the airport....cheap....but we didn't get a heck of a lot of sleep anyway as we stayed in the park until the team left....watch them get on the bus to the hotel (Adams Mark...real long ride...LOL)....ran to the Adams Mark hotel and waited for them to leave again and then went to the hotel. Exhausting...but fun.

I actually had tickets for game 5 as well....but I sent those back and got most of the money refunded. I got both the game 4 and game 5 tickets on e-bay. I want to say they were about $500/ticket. My game 4 ticket was a bit cheaper because it was standing room. They were sold by a ticket broker in both cases, not individual fans. It may seem like a lot, but ONE bleacher seat at Fenway for the World Series was running $1,500. I managed to get a very cheap package where the three of us got 2 nights in the hotel and airfare for about $850. Then the tickets were $1,500. A little more for the rental car and incidentals and the whole trip (only going to one game) ended up costing me less than 2 bleacher seats at Fenway for the WS.

My kids got lucky and got upgraded to seats in the 200's instead of 300's. You know how they always say you will get these tickets or a substitute that is better...well, for once, the better happened. They wouldn't upgrade me because I was standing room, but I ended up in a great seat on the 3rd base side, second level, second row, by the foul pole.

When we did get out on Friday, we went into the city and visited the arch, but it was already around 4 p.m. and we couldn't get in and do anything. Walked around a bit....but I was a zombie and just couldn't take anything in at that point.

Every time I see Busch stadium on TV now....I have memories....

Ruth
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Sandi
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PostPosted: Mon 8/15/05 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ruth,

Thanks for sharing that story. What a wise investment you made!
I was just wondering if maybe you came to St. Louis just hoping to get a ticket, like so many people did.
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Francine
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PostPosted: Mon 8/15/05 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Linda, your welcome. I knew Ruth would enjoy our littel community Very Happy

Ruth, an official welcome from me too Wink

I love hearing these stories too!
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crzblue



Joined: 11 Aug 2005
Posts: 1847
Location: Dodgerland, CA

PostPosted: Fri 8/19/05 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How I became a Dodger and Baseball fan.

My name is Emma. I was born in Honduras and came to the L.A.area when I was 13. No one in my family followed baseball so my first boyfriend introduced me to the game when I was 20 (long time ago) . He took me to my first game and I remember that he would listen to Vin Scully on the radio. I did not pay much attention as I would argue with him that Football was better than baseball. He would explain baseball to me and I would explain Football. I was a big Ram Fan then. He was born in Maine so his baseball team was the Red Sox but he was a fan of the Dodgers.

After we went our separate ways, I started attending some games with a very nice older Jewish lady from Brooklyn that used to talk about Sandy Koufax. I started getting into the game more and more. The last games of 1980 had left me elated and devastated when we pushed for an extra playoff game with the Astros. that was an incredible last 3 games of the season where one game would have eliminated the Dodgers but they kept fighting back. We won in incredible fashion Friday, Saturday and Sunday. After it was official that we had won Sunday's game, I got in line to buy a ticket for the extra playoff game on Monday. I remember I went to work that morning early and walked into my boss's office to tell him I was only working half a day His response was "I am surprise you are even here.." Monday's game was such a letdown with a lot of second guessing Lasorda. I sat in my car for quite a while all depressed.

November of 1980 I decided to purchase a season ticket for next year. I remember they took me to see a Loge seat (aisle 103 N 103) and that became my seat for 1981 and 1982. What a year 1981 was with the start of Fernandomania and culminating with the Dodgers beating the Yankees in the World Series!! Very Happy

I had the season ticket for one more years and afterwards I still attended games but not so much as I wanted to go back to school. I started attending less and less games until I would only watch some on TV or just playoffs. Things like free agency, strikes started turning me off. I tell LInda that I have a gap a years that I've been catching up. Back in 2000 this guy had 3 extra tickets to a game and he invited me along with two other women from work, then someone else invited me to another game and before long my addiction to baseball was back in full force..

Ran into the old boyfriend many years ago and he could not believe how much I had gotten into the game. He did tell me "remember when you used to say football was better than baseballl...." Smile
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dodgerblue6



Joined: 10 Aug 2005
Posts: 12445
Location: San Diego CA - deep in the heart of SoCal

PostPosted: Sat 8/20/05 8:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Emma, thanks for sharing your story. I must add for those who are reading that I am envious of Emma having had season tickets the year of Fernandomania as I can't recall a more exciting rookie season for anyone (and believe me, I follow more than just the Dodgers). The amazing way he started out in the major leagues at just age 20, pitching complete game shutout after complete game shutout, is something I don't think you will ever see again. To cap it off, the Dodgers won the World Series that year and it was an exhilarating feeling...had I lived closer, I would have bought season tickets myself!

Over the past four years I have met several very good Dodger fans through the dodgers.com message board. Before, I used to feel I was a lonely Dodger fan in S.D. which is comprised of Padres fans and fans of every other team imaginable since SoCal is full of transplants. There are lots of Dodger fans here too but they are scattered around and I never was able to bond with anyone. In 2001 when I was first unemployed and depressed (after working 22 years at the same job) I finally got on the Internet and found two message boards that became my "homes." One was dodgers.com where I encountered many Azul fans who lived and died with the same team as we pushed once more right down to the final week of the season with the hated Giants. In the end it was the expansion Diamondbacks who ended up winning our division and going on to win the W.S., even as most of us were still dazed after the shocking events of 9/11. I also met someone who became my very good friend, Harpo (our co-mod) who, as it turns out by eerie coincidence, was a Dodger fan living six blocks away from me. We had lived in the same neighborhood for years, but didn't know each other until we were posting on the Dodgers' board about going to Dodger games against the Padres at Qualcomm. When he found out where in San Diego it was that I lived, he emailed me back, "You are just a Shawn Green home run away..."

That year, I also found what was known as the Baseballchicks message board, which is the predecessor of this one. That is where I know some of you from originally. I was so happy to find other women who loved the game like I do and learn about different fans' experiences with different teams. We had one Angels fan who I wish I could locate now, who was so depressed during the 2002 AL division series because she thought they were going to be eliminated--but they weren't--and then what an exciting seven-game World Series that was, with the Hated Ones choking away the lead in the last two games.

In 2002 and 2003 several of us on the dodgers.com board began organizing group outings to Dodger Stadium and road trips for the L.A. people to S.D., so many of us met "off the board" that way. In 2004, I was fortunate to meet Crzblue at one of the many trips I made to L.A. with message board groups. We also both got very involved in studying the history of baseball and the Dodgers, and began posting regularly in a thread on the Dodgers' board, "This Day in Baseball History." Lately it has been Crzblue keeping that up more often as I haven't been as active. I started the current job I'm working in almost at the same time baseball season started, and since I don't have Internet access at work I've had a lot of things vying for my time when I'm at home. (That's one of the reasons it took so long to get this board up and running again after the EZboard was hacked.) During the offseason, all the reading and posting about history was a good way to keep us busy, but then we started talking about spring training coming up. Also during the offseason, Crzblue and I went to the "I Live for This" commercial auditions at Dodger Stadium (some of you might remember that experience from the old board!). While we were there we were talking to another fan about spring training coming up in March. This discussion culminated in both of us deciding to, and finally actually realizing the dream of, going to Vero Beach for the first time ever to see the Dodgers in ST in March. (To the Red Sox fans, one of the games they played was against the Sox.) This was something I'd been wanting to do for 30 years, and I had the time of my life!

Also, last September, Idnas and three other Cardinal fan friends came on a trip to SoCal and went to games in both L.A. and S.D., and I traveled with them between the cities. We did a lot of non-baseball related things too, and wow, that was some fun we all had together! I look forward to seeing them again sometime, wherever that may be, but no doubt it will be at a ballpark somewhere! Of course, the thread detailing our experiences on the EZboard disappeared Crying or Very sad but that sure was a great time!

So being on these message boards, for me personally, has led to great friendships and some wonderful experiences that I probably would not have had otherwise.
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"The Dodgers have always occupied an enormous place in the history of the game. If the Yankees are the most successful team in baseball history, the Dodgers are the most essential. Their legacy is unique."

-Baseball Hall of Fame
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PhillieBlue
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PostPosted: Sun 8/21/05 11:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi everyone!

I can't recall the exact moment I became a baseball fan, but my earliest baseball memory was in June, 1959. I had fallen out of my oldest brother's bunk bed and broken my arm. Because I had just eaten dinner, the doctor couldn't put me to sleep to set the arm until the next day. He put it in a splint and sent me home until the next morning. my mom and dad let me sleep in their bed, since I was in so much pain, and my dad had the radio on. The Phillies were playing the Dodgers in LA, and I fell asleep listening to the sounds of the game.

I first remember following the Phillies in 1964. I watched Jim Bunning's perfect game on TV on Father's Day of that year, and I cried when the Phillies blew a 10 game lead and didn't make it to the World Series. My dad only took me to one game at Connie Mack Stadium. We sat in the upper deck, right over the Phillies' dugout. My brothers and I leaned out over the railing and tried to get Wes Covington's attention by yelling "Hey Wes!" He finally looked up at us and waved. That was the best!

My next baseball memory was going with my brothers and grandfather to Veteran's Stadium. We had gone to a restaurant before the game, and I had a pocket full of red napkins. There was a rain delay, and my grandfather told us he would wait in the car. We wandered around the stadium, and one of us (I'll never tell) decided it would be a good idea to try and get Richie Ashburn's autograph. Richie was one of the Phillies' broadcasters. I pulled out one of the red napkins and wrote on it, "Hi Richie. Could we please have your autograph?" and signed it "The Moorestown Gang" We found several discarded rain ponchos, and tore them into strips which we then tied together. We tied the note to the end and dangled it in front of the broadcast booth. It looked like we were fishing. I felt a tug on the plastic and as I pulled it up, I heard one of my brothers say "Uh oh!" I turned around to see about 6 security guards heading our way. As they approached us, I heard Richie's voice over the walkie-talkie saying, "It's OK. They're just some kids who were trying to get an autograph." It didn't matter. We were ejected from the ballpark, but we had gotten the autograph!

I had lost track of the napkin until about 5 years ago. At Christmas, my mom handed me a flat box, and when I opened it, there was the napkin, framed, with the autograph still visible!

While that is a great baseball memory, it's not my favourite. When I first got a computer, about 10 years ago, I discovered Chat Rooms. I made a lot of friends there, and met a lot of weirdos, too. In May, 1996, I was in the chat room at a time I was usually at work. (I was curious to see who was there during the day) I got an IM from someone calling himself BigBlaster. He said he liked my nickname (babytoes) and did I really like baseball, like my profile said? Now, I had gotten IMs from tons of people (I swear, I have met everyone with a foot fetish on the whole internet!!) so I didn't mind talking to this Blaster person. I told him I loved baseball, I followed the Phillies and I had season tickets since 1977. At the end of the conversation, BigBlaster asked me if I wanted to see his picture. I said yes, and gave him my email address.

Now, for those of you who remember, back in those days, pictures loaded one line at a time. I went to my email and pulled up the email. As the picture loaded, the first thing I saw was a blue Dodger cap, then a really nice smile. As it loaded down further, I started to laugh. The man in the picture was wearing a T-shirt that said, "Baseball is life. The rest is just details." I was wearing the SAME T-shirt, sitting in front of the computer, talking to him! I went back and told him (I'm not sure he believed me)

BigBlaster and I were married on July 5, 1997, and we spent our wedding night at the Phillies game.
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dodgerblue6



Joined: 10 Aug 2005
Posts: 12445
Location: San Diego CA - deep in the heart of SoCal

PostPosted: Sun 8/21/05 1:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OMG, it's you! I saw you had registered under your "original name" first...hmmm...I thought that one was cute!

Anyway, good to have you here. Great story!

For the rest of you here, after several years of brief encounters around various boards, I finally met Big Blaster and BBGiNJ at a Dodger game last month! They are great fans (with conflicting team interests!) but a deep love for the game of baseball...
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"The Dodgers have always occupied an enormous place in the history of the game. If the Yankees are the most successful team in baseball history, the Dodgers are the most essential. Their legacy is unique."

-Baseball Hall of Fame
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la_periodista
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PostPosted: Sun 8/21/05 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was born to love the Dodgers. My uncle grew up watching baseball, and a couple of my mom's relatives worked at Dodger Stadium years ago. Her dad didn't really like sports, but he enjoyed watching baseball. As a young child growing, I got to watch players like Orel Herschiser, Mike Scioscia, Ramon Martinez. I was five when the Dodgers won the '88 series, although I don't remember it. But I have a shirt commemorating it that used to be my brother's, and it still fits me! Smile
My early baseball memories involve watching Dodger games with my dad and us sifting through new packs of baseball cards. He would always give me the holographic sticker card and the stale piece of bubble gum.
My first game was in 1989, against the Giants. I was a wide-eyed five-year-old seeing Dodger Stadium in person for the first time, and against their most hated rivals! To this day, I have no idea why, but I was obsessed with Eddie Murray; I loved watching him play. One of my only memories from my first game is when he struck out, I believe swinging, and I got mad at the umpire, so I stood up and yelled as loud as I could, "Are you blind?!" I also faintly remember my dad lifting me up to do the wave.
After watching five straight Dodger rookies of the year (92-96) as a (pre-)teen, I lost touch with baseball for a few years. But in 2000, I watched the Dodger season opener in Montreal and rediscovered my love for baseball (as part of my love for new outfielder Shawn Green Wink ). I became a Dodger fanatic; I couldn't get enough. Five years later, I'm not as crazy about baseball as I was then, but I still adore it. Dodger Stadium is still the only major-league ballpark to which I've been. And being a fan has helped me in other aspects of my life: I turned my bf onto the sport, and we love watching games together, whether at the stadium or on television. The rebirth of baseball in my life also helped convince me to turn the focus of my studies from science to journalism in hopes of becoming a sportscaster/writer. It even helped me get a position as a staff writer/MLB correspondent for a baseball site. And one of the best parts is that when I'm at Dodger Stadium, even when the Dodgers are playing poorly, I can kick back, relax, and enjoy the atmosphere.
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Harpo



Joined: 09 Aug 2005
Posts: 340
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: Sun 8/21/05 1:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

baseballgirlnj wrote:
BigBlaster asked me if I wanted to see his picture. I said yes, ... As the picture loaded, the first thing I saw was a blue Dodger cap, then a really nice smile. As it loaded down further, I started to laugh.

I can just imagine your reaction if he had sent you this picture.

Cool
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PhillieBlue
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PostPosted: Sun 8/21/05 6:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aw, geeze! That picture was a couple of years and about 100 pounds ago! I still have my blue and white wig. We got in it spring training and I wore it to a night game.
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PhillieBlue
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PostPosted: Sun 8/21/05 6:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BTW, for those who haven't figured out, I am really PhillieBlue. I made the dopey mistake of clicking the registration button that said "I am under 13" (I wish!) That means, I got an email with a certification for my parents to sign stating I am allowed to post here. Laughing
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Francine
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PostPosted: Sun 8/21/05 6:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Silly girl.........lol welcome. I don't remember you from the other board but I'm the one they used to call mpnut. I'm from Jersey too and a Phillies fan too!

Cute story, thanks for sharing it.
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PhillieBlue
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PostPosted: Sun 8/21/05 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Francine.
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dodgerblue6



Joined: 10 Aug 2005
Posts: 12445
Location: San Diego CA - deep in the heart of SoCal

PostPosted: Sun 8/21/05 9:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I don't remember you from the other board


Francine,
She wasn't on the other board, but I'm glad she's here now.

The pic Harpo posted a link to was taken at the Vet.
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"The Dodgers have always occupied an enormous place in the history of the game. If the Yankees are the most successful team in baseball history, the Dodgers are the most essential. Their legacy is unique."

-Baseball Hall of Fame
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