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Independence Day and Baseball - 2018 and Through History

 
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dodgerblue6



Joined: 10 Aug 2005
Posts: 17151
Location: San Diego CA - deep in the heart of SoCal

PostPosted: Wed 7/4/18 11:08 am    Post subject: Independence Day and Baseball - 2018 and Through History Reply with quote

Today we celebrate our nation's independence. But when honoring our history, let's remember it's not just about Founding Fathers, but about our favorite game as well. After doing a bit of research through old posts in this forum from July 4 of previous years, I ran across some history that hadn't been shared in awhile. So I thought I'd re-post it--a little background on Fourth of July baseball through the ages:

Back in the day, the Fourth of July traditionally saw a slate of scheduled doubleheaders, but over the years that's changed. For an entertaining look back at Fourth of July games as recorded over the years by baseball historians, read on. From historic milestones, emotional speeches, and comedic plays, to acts of violence, there's a little bit of everything.

Here's a round-up of selected moments from our national pastime that occurred on this holiday. I combined these from several historical websites and sources, including baseball-almanac.com and baseballlibrary.com.

2000

The Cardinals defeated the Reds, 14-3. St. Louis rookie catcher Keith McDonald became only the third player in Cards history to homer in his first major league at-bat doing so as a pinch-hitter in the eighth inning against Andy Larkin.

1985

In a marathon game that bordered on the surreal, the Mets endured two rain delays and 6:10 of playing time to beat the Braves 16-13 in 19 innings on Fireworks Night in Atlanta. The Mets had taken a 10-8 lead in the top of the 13th inning, only to watch the Braves tie it up. The Mets scored again in the 18th, but relief hurler Rick Camp (a .060 hitter who was batting because Atlanta had no more position players available to pinch-hit) tied the score with his first ML home run on a two-out, two-strike pitch in the bottom of the inning. No pitcher ever homered that late in a game before. Finally the Mets erupted for five runs in the 19th off Camp and Atlanta could respond with only two. Keith Hernandez hit for the cycle for the Mets, and the game ended at 3:55 A.M. on July 5, which at that time was the latest finish in MLB history. At 4:01 A.M. the post-game fireworks display began, causing local residents to think the city was under attack.

1984

Phil Niekro struck out five batters in the Yankees' 5-0 win over Texas to become the ninth pitcher in MLB history to record 3,000 career strikeouts.

1980

Nolan Ryan fanned the Reds' Cesar Geronimo to become the fourth pitcher ever to have 3,000 career strikeouts. Ironically, Geronimo was also Bob Gibson's 3,000th career strikeout victim six years earlier. Despite the milestone, Ryan allowed six runs in 4 1/3 innings and Houston lost, 8-1.

1976

On the nation's Bicentennial anniversary, Philadelphia split a doubleheader with Pittsburgh, 10-5 and 7-1. In the first game, the Phillies' Tim McCarver lost a grand slam when he passed teammate Garry Maddox on the bases.
McCarver had three RBI with his single.

1969

In the first year of division play in the National League, the Dodgers overtook first place in the NL West by sweeping a doubleheader against the Braves in Los Angeles, winning 7-6 and 7-3.

At Chicago, the Giants closed out their road trip by rolling to a 19-3 win in Game 1, collecting 22 hits including a homer by Orlando Cepeda that was one of the longest in Wrigley history. The Cubs came back in the nightcap to win, 3-2, overcoming Willie Mays' 300th homer.

1960

Mickey Mantle's three-run first-inning homer off Hal Woodeshick was the 300th of his career. Mantle became the 18th player to join the 300 HR club, but the Yankees dropped a 9-8 decision to Washington.

1950

Before 49,316 at the Polo Grounds, the Dodgers and Giants split a pair. Brooklyn lost its sixth straight in the opener, 5-4, before coming back to win, 5-3. Don Newcombe took the loss in Game 1, despite hitting his first major league HR. Alvin Dark homered in each game. A tragic note occurred when a 56-year-old fan named Bernard Doyle was struck and killed by a bullet fired from outside the stadium. The New York Daily News reported that after his body was removed the standing-room-only crowd fought over the vacant seat. Evil or Very Mad (insert personal observation: Jints fans!...sheesh!)

1949

At New York, the Yankees swept two games from Boston, thanks in part to the weather. The 3-2 and 6-4 losses extended the Red Sox' losing streak to eight games. In the opener, the Sox entered the ninth trailing by a run despite homers by Dom DiMaggio and Vern Stephens. When Stephens was walked to load the bases with one out, dark clouds suddenly blocked the sun and a violent wind blew dust that obscured the outfielders. Boston batter Al Zarilla then lined a single to left field, but Johnny Pesky, the runner on third, couldn't see if the ball was caught by Cliff Mapes or not. The perfect throw home forced Pesky, and Bobby Doerr popped out. In Game 2, Joe DiMaggio's fifth homer tied the game at 4 in the fifth, and Billy Johnson's bases loaded single in the seventh off Mel Parnell decided it. Darkness halted the second game--delayed 48 minutes because of rain--after 7 1/2 innings, leaving New York leading Boston by 12 games.

1948

Ted Williams faced three pitchers in the seventh inning, a first in AL history, as Boston snapped a 5-5 tie by scoring 14 runs on 14 RBI to beat the visiting Philadelphia Athletics, 20-8. "A"s pitcher Charlie Harris retired one batter in 14 and coughed up 12 runs, before Bill McCahan took over. Williams, who made the final out in the inning, and Bobby Doerr tied records by drawing two walks apiece.

Led by Roy Campanella's first two major league homers, the host Dodgers edged the Giants, 13-12, in a wild game lasting 3 1/2 hours. Thirty-seven players saw action, 20 by Brooklyn, as both teams scored four times in the ninth.

1939

In between games against the Washington Senators, a tearful Lou Gehrig bid farewell to 61,808 fans at Yankee Stadium with a short and moving speech.

"Fans, for the past two weeks you have been reading about a bad break I got.
Yet today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth. I have been in ballparks for seventeen years and I have never received anything but kindness and encouragement from you fans. Look at these grand men. Which of you wouldn't consider it the highlight of his career just to associate with them for even one day? Sure, I'm lucky. Who wouldn't consider it an honor to have known Jacob Ruppert? Also, the builder of baseball's greatest empire, Ed Barrow? To have spent six years with that wonderful little fellow, Miller Huggins? Then to have spent the next nine years with that outstanding leader, that smart student of psychology, the best manager in baseball today, Joe McCarthy? Sure, I'm lucky. When the New York Giants, a team you would give your right arm to beat--and vice versa--sends you a gift, that's something. When everybody down to the groundskeepers and those boys in white coats remember you with trophies, that's something. When you have a father and mother who work all their lives so that you can have an education and build your body, it's a blessing. When you have a wife who has been a tower of strength and shown more courage than you dreamed existed, that's the finest I know. So I close in saying that I might have had a bad break, but I have an awful lot to live for. Thank you."

His teammates give Gehrig a silver trophy with all their signatures on it and inscribed with the following poem by writer John Kieran:

We've been to the wars together;
We took our foes as they came;
And always you were the leader,
And ever you played the game.
Idol of cheering millions;
Records are yours by the sheaves;
Iron of frame they hailed you,
Decked you with laurel leaves.
But higher than that we hold you,
We who have known you best;
Knowing the way you came through
Every human test.
Let this be a silent token
Of lasting friendship's gleam
And all that we've left unspoken.
---Your pals of the Yankee team


Gehrig's uniform number 4 was then retired, the first major league player so honored in this manner. The Yankees split, losing the opener, 3-2, to Dutch Leonard, then took the nightcap, 11-1.

1934

When Dodgers manager Casey Stengel came out to the mound to remove pitcher "Boom Boom" Beck from the game in Philadelphia's Baker Bowl, the frustrated Beck turned and fired the ball at the tin wall in right field. Dodgers outfielder Hack Wilson, not paying attention to the happenings, heard the ball clang off the wall, and hurried to retrieve it. He then fired a strike to second base to prevent the imaginary runner from advancing.

Laughing Laughing Laughing

(Here's Wilson again...what a hothead!)

1929

After singling in the eighth, the Cubs' Hack Wilson jumped into the Reds' dugout to fight pitcher Ray Kolp, who had been needling him. Wilson was stopped and ejected before reaching Kolp, and also tagged out by Chuck Dressen. The Cubs won, 10-5, and that evening, when both teams were at Chicago's Union Station awaiting trains, Wilson floored Reds pitcher Pete Donahue. Wilson would be briefly suspended for the fight. Later in the year, Wilson would go into the stands to floor a heckler. (The heckler suffered a cut lip and sued Wilson for $20,000, but the charges were dismissed.)

1919

In the morning game of an AM-PM doubleheader, the Jints' Jesse Barnes hurls a 3-1 one-hit win over the Phillies. The only hit was Gavvy Cravath's home run.

1914

At the Polo Grounds, the Giants swept an AM-PM twin bill from the Phillies, winning 5-4 and 3-0. Christy Mathewson, in winning the shutout, recorded his 350th career victory.

1902

At Exposition Park, the Pirates literally splashed their way to a doubleheader shutout over visiting Brooklyn, winning 3-0 and 4-0 behind Jesse Tannehill and Jack Chesbro. Tannehill allowed three runners to reach first base in an errorless game for the Bucs. Because of heavy rains and flooding from the Allegheny River, a portion of the first game and all of the second are played with part of the field under water (according to Ed Luteran). The water was about thigh deep in center and right fields, and about head deep in deep center field, where any ball hit was a single. Players would occasionally catch a ball and dive under the water.

1900

In Chicago, the Colts swept Philadelphia, winning 10-4 and 5-4, in 12 innings. A number of fans fired pistols to celebrate the holiday but no injuries occurred.

At Cincinnati, in the third inning of Game 2, Jints first baseman Jack Doyle slugged umpire Robert Emslie after being called out on a steal attempt. Fans jumped from the stands as the two got into it and players finally separated the two fighters. Two policemen chased the fans back into the stands and then arrested Doyle, taking him to the York Street station. He was fined for the assault. The Reds lost the nightcap, 6-3, after winning the opener, 8-1.

1879

A holiday crowd of more than 5,000 turned out in Philadelphia to see a widely advertised game between two women's teams, the New York Blue Stockings and the Philadelphia Red Stockings. The teams, connected with variety theaters, were playing for "the championship of the U.S." The Blue Stockings won, 36-24, in a loosely played game cut short when the unruly crowd got out of control.

1867

The Cincinnati Baseball Club played its first game at the Union Grounds, in back of Cincinnati's Lincoln Park, whipping Louisville, 60-24. It was the first game in Cincinnati attended by the general public, at which an admission was charged, and a newspaper covered the game.

***********

Whew! Some of those I had forgotten about. It should be noted that it appears baseball didn't always have "civility" back in the day, either.

Happy Fourth of July!
_________________
"The Dodgers have always occupied an enormous place in the history of the game. If the Yankees are the most successful team in baseball history, the Dodgers are the most essential. Their legacy is unique."

-Baseball Hall of Fame
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forloveofthegame



Joined: 23 Oct 2009
Posts: 5615
Location: San Diego

PostPosted: Thu 7/5/18 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is quite a wrap up! Some of those things I had never heard about before! But interesting they all happened on July 4.

Sadly my Padres lost their game this year on the holiday. Sad
_________________
"Baseball is an allegorical play about America, a poetic, complex, and subtle play of courage, fear, good luck, mistakes, patience about fate, and sober self-esteem." - Saul Steinberg
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dodgerblue6



Joined: 10 Aug 2005
Posts: 17151
Location: San Diego CA - deep in the heart of SoCal

PostPosted: Thu 7/4/19 6:11 pm    Post subject: Independence Day and Baseball - 2019 and Through History Reply with quote

Today we celebrate our nation's independence. But when honoring our history, let's remember it's not just about Founding Fathers, but about our favorite game as well.

Thought I would re-post a little background on Fourth of July baseball through the ages, based on compiling past Independence Day threads from previous research.

Back in the day, the Fourth of July traditionally saw a slate of scheduled doubleheaders, but over the years that's changed. For an entertaining look back at Fourth of July games as recorded over the years by baseball historians, read on. From historic milestones, emotional speeches, and comedic plays, to acts of violence, there's a little bit of everything.

Here's a round-up of selected moments from our national pastime that occurred on this holiday. I combined these from several historical websites and sources, including baseball-almanac.com and baseballlibrary.com.

2000

The Cardinals defeated the Reds, 14-3. St. Louis rookie catcher Keith McDonald became only the third player in Cards history to homer in his first major league at-bat doing so as a pinch-hitter in the eighth inning against Andy Larkin.

1985

In a marathon game that bordered on the surreal, the Mets endured two rain delays and 6:10 of playing time to beat the Braves 16-13 in 19 innings on Fireworks Night in Atlanta. The Mets had taken a 10-8 lead in the top of the 13th inning, only to watch the Braves tie it up. The Mets scored again in the 18th, but relief hurler Rick Camp (a .060 hitter who was batting because Atlanta had no more position players available to pinch-hit) tied the score with his first ML home run on a two-out, two-strike pitch in the bottom of the inning. No pitcher ever homered that late in a game before. Finally the Mets erupted for five runs in the 19th off Camp and Atlanta could respond with only two. Keith Hernandez hit for the cycle for the Mets, and the game ended at 3:55 A.M. on July 5, which at that time was the latest finish in MLB history. At 4:01 A.M. the post-game fireworks display began, causing local residents to think the city was under attack.

1984

Phil Niekro struck out five batters in the Yankees' 5-0 win over Texas to become the ninth pitcher in MLB history to record 3,000 career strikeouts.

1980

Nolan Ryan fanned the Reds' Cesar Geronimo to become the fourth pitcher ever to have 3,000 career strikeouts. Ironically, Geronimo was also Bob Gibson's 3,000th career strikeout victim six years earlier. Despite the milestone, Ryan allowed six runs in 4 1/3 innings and Houston lost, 8-1.

1976

On the nation's Bicentennial anniversary, Philadelphia split a doubleheader with Pittsburgh, 10-5 and 7-1. In the first game, the Phillies' Tim McCarver lost a grand slam when he passed teammate Garry Maddox on the bases.
McCarver had three RBI with his single.

1969

In the first year of division play in the National League, the Dodgers overtook first place in the NL West by sweeping a doubleheader against the Braves in Los Angeles, winning 7-6 and 7-3.

At Chicago, the Giants closed out their road trip by rolling to a 19-3 win in Game 1, collecting 22 hits including a homer by Orlando Cepeda that was one of the longest in Wrigley history. The Cubs came back in the nightcap to win, 3-2, overcoming Willie Mays' 300th homer.

1960

Mickey Mantle's three-run first-inning homer off Hal Woodeshick was the 300th of his career. Mantle became the 18th player to join the 300 HR club, but the Yankees dropped a 9-8 decision to Washington.

1950

Before 49,316 at the Polo Grounds, the Dodgers and Giants split a pair.
Brooklyn lost its sixth straight in the opener, 5-4, before coming back to win, 5-3. Don Newcombe took the loss in Game 1, despite hitting his first major league HR. Alvin Dark homered in each game. A tragic note occurred when a 56-year-old fan named Bernard Doyle was struck and killed by a bullet fired from outside the stadium. The New York Daily News reported that after his body was removed the standing-room-only crowd fought over the vacant seat. Mad (insert personal observation: Jints fans!...sheesh!)

1949

At New York, the Yankees swept two games from Boston, thanks in part to the weather. The 3-2 and 6-4 losses extended the Red Sox' losing streak to eight games. In the opener, the Sox entered the ninth trailing by a run despite homers by Dom DiMaggio and Vern Stephens. When Stephens was walked to load the bases with one out, dark clouds suddenly blocked the sun and a violent wind blew dust that obscured the outfielders. Boston batter Al Zarilla then lined a single to left field, but Johnny Pesky, the runner on third, couldn't see if the ball was caught by Cliff Mapes or not. The perfect throw home forced Pesky, and Bobby Doerr popped out. In Game 2, Joe DiMaggio's fifth homer tied the game at 4 in the fifth, and Billy Johnson's bases loaded single in the seventh off Mel Parnell decided it. Darkness halted the second game--delayed 48 minutes because of rain--after 7 1/2 innings, leaving New York leading Boston by 12 games.

1948

Ted Williams faced three pitchers in the seventh inning, a first in AL history, as Boston snapped a 5-5 tie by scoring 14 runs on 14 RBI to beat the visiting Philadelphia Athletics, 20-8. "A"s pitcher Charlie Harris retired one batter in 14 and coughed up 12 runs, before Bill McCahan took over. Williams, who made the final out in the inning, and Bobby Doerr tied records by drawing two walks apiece.

Led by Roy Campanella's first two major league homers, the host Dodgers edged the Giants, 13-12, in a wild game lasting 3 1/2 hours. Thirty-seven players saw action, 20 by Brooklyn, as both teams scored four times in the ninth.

1939

In between games against the Washington Senators, a tearful Lou Gehrig bid farewell to 61,808 fans at Yankee Stadium with a short and moving speech.

"Fans, for the past two weeks you have been reading about a bad break I got.
Yet today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth. I have been in ballparks for seventeen years and I have never received anything but kindness and encouragement from you fans. Look at these grand men. Which of you wouldn't consider it the highlight of his career just to associate with them for even one day? Sure, I'm lucky. Who wouldn't consider it an honor to have known Jacob Ruppert? Also, the builder of baseball's greatest empire, Ed Barrow? To have spent six years with that wonderful little fellow, Miller Huggins? Then to have spent the next nine years with that outstanding leader, that smart student of psychology, the best manager in baseball today, Joe McCarthy? Sure, I'm lucky. When the New York Giants, a team you would give your right arm to beat--and vice versa--sends you a gift, that's something. When everybody down to the groundskeepers and those boys in white coats remember you with trophies, that's something. When you have a father and mother who work all their lives so that you can have an education and build your body, it's a blessing. When you have a wife who has been a tower of strength and shown more courage than you dreamed existed, that's the finest I know. So I close in saying that I might have had a bad break, but I have an awful lot to live for. Thank you."

His teammates give Gehrig a silver trophy with all their signatures on it and inscribed with the following poem by writer John Kieran:

We've been to the wars together;
We took our foes as they came;
And always you were the leader,
And ever you played the game.
Idol of cheering millions;
Records are yours by the sheaves;
Iron of frame they hailed you,
Decked you with laurel leaves.
But higher than that we hold you,
We who have known you best;
Knowing the way you came through
Every human test.
Let this be a silent token
Of lasting friendship's gleam
And all that we've left unspoken.
---Your pals of the Yankee team


Gehrig's uniform number 4 was then retired, the first major league player so honored in this manner. The Yankees split, losing the opener, 3-2, to Dutch Leonard, then took the nightcap, 11-1.

1934

When Dodgers manager Casey Stengel came out to the mound to remove pitcher "Boom Boom" Beck from the game in Philadelphia's Baker Bowl, the frustrated Beck turned and fired the ball at the tin wall in right field. Dodgers outfielder Hack Wilson, not paying attention to the happenings, heard the ball clang off the wall, and hurried to retrieve it. He then fired a strike to second base to prevent the imaginary runner from advancing.

:lol Laughing

(Here's Wilson again...what a hothead!)

1929

After singling in the eighth, the Cubs' Hack Wilson jumped into the Reds' dugout to fight pitcher Ray Kolp, who had been needling him. Wilson was stopped and ejected before reaching Kolp, and also tagged out by Chuck Dressen. The Cubs won, 10-5, and that evening, when both teams were at Chicago's Union Station awaiting trains, Wilson floored Reds pitcher Pete Donahue. Wilson would be briefly suspended for the fight. Later in the year, Wilson would go into the stands to floor a heckler. (The heckler suffered a cut lip and sued Wilson for $20,000, but the charges were dismissed.)

1919

In the morning game of an AM-PM doubleheader, the Jints' Jesse Barnes hurls a 3-1 one-hit win over the Phillies. The only hit was Gavvy Cravath's home run.

1914

At the Polo Grounds, the Jints swept an AM-PM twin bill from the Phillies, winning 5-4 and 3-0. Christy Mathewson, in winning the shutout, recorded his 350th career victory.

1902

At Exposition Park, the Pirates literally splashed their way to a doubleheader shutout over visiting Brooklyn, winning 3-0 and 4-0 behind Jesse Tannehill and Jack Chesbro. Tannehill allowed three runners to reach first base in an errorless game for the Bucs. Because of heavy rains and flooding from the Allegheny River, a portion of the first game and all of the second are played with part of the field under water (according to Ed Luteran). The water was about thigh deep in center and right fields, and about head deep in deep center field, where any ball hit was a single. Players would occasionally catch a ball and dive under the water.

1900

In Chicago, the Colts swept Philadelphia, winning 10-4 and 5-4, in 12 innings. A number of fans fired pistols to celebrate the holiday but no injuries occurred.

At Cincinnati, in the third inning of Game 2, Jints first baseman Jack Doyle slugged umpire Robert Emslie after being called out on a steal attempt. Fans jumped from the stands as the two got into it and players finally separated the two fighters. Two policemen chased the fans back into the stands and then arrested Doyle, taking him to the York Street station. He was fined for the assault. The Reds lost the nightcap, 6-3, after winning the opener, 8-1.

1879

A holiday crowd of more than 5,000 turned out in Philadelphia to see a widely advertised game between two women's teams, the New York Blue Stockings and the Philadelphia Red Stockings. The teams, connected with variety theaters, were playing for "the championship of the U.S." The Blue Stockings won, 36-24, in a loosely played game cut short when the unruly crowd got out of control.

1867

The Cincinnati Baseball Club played its first game at the Union Grounds, in back of Cincinnati's Lincoln Park, whipping Louisville, 60-24. It was the first game in Cincinnati attended by the general public, at which an admission was charged, and a newspaper covered the game.

***********

Whew! Some of those I had forgotten about. It should be noted that it appears baseball didn't always have "civility" back in the day, either.

Happy Fourth of July!
_________________
"The Dodgers have always occupied an enormous place in the history of the game. If the Yankees are the most successful team in baseball history, the Dodgers are the most essential. Their legacy is unique."

-Baseball Hall of Fame
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forloveofthegame



Joined: 23 Oct 2009
Posts: 5615
Location: San Diego

PostPosted: Fri 7/5/19 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hope you ladies enjoyed your day, too. My goodness, what beautiful weather that was. We enjoyed a BBQ at some friends' new home. They just moved to the Fallbrook/Bonsall area. A lot further from where they used to live, but stunning views all around!
_________________
"Baseball is an allegorical play about America, a poetic, complex, and subtle play of courage, fear, good luck, mistakes, patience about fate, and sober self-esteem." - Saul Steinberg
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sunnyblue



Joined: 22 Nov 2008
Posts: 2035
Location: San Diego County, CA

PostPosted: Sat 7/6/19 6:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Happy belated Independence Day! We were at the beach all day until time to come home to watch Dodgers vs. Padres.
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