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Honoring a Player of Splendid Achievement
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dodgerblue6



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PostPosted: Tue 8/30/11 10:29 am    Post subject: Honoring a Player of Splendid Achievement Reply with quote

Ninety-three years ago today, the "Splendid Splinter" was born. Like me, he too was a native San Diegan.

But I've thought a lot about how this season marks the 70th anniversary of the last time a major leaguer hit .400. Over the course of his 19-year career, Teddy Samuel Williams hit .344 with a .482 OBP and a .634 slugging percentage.

Over the decades, he became a source of pride for many. Red Sox great, America's Finest City-born. War hero and USMC aviator. Former PCL Padre. (That's for you, Cathy.) Smile North Park legend and Hoover High star.

No matter what, he was the greatest pure hitter who ever lived.




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sunnyblue



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PostPosted: Tue 8/30/11 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

His numbers were incredible but he was also a great combat veteran. I think his feisty personality helped him there, lol.

I love the tribute to him in the Hall of Champions and at Petco Park.
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forloveofthegame



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PostPosted: Wed 8/31/11 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

He was a tough player and from what I understand, had a problem with the Boston media in the early years, but they came to respect him. How could they not? Thank you for posting this, Linda. Happy birthday to the one and only Splendid Splinter!
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forloveofthegame



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PostPosted: Sun 9/4/11 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just wanted to post this picture. I remember when Ted and Tony were both campaigning for Prop. C to get Petco Park built. They sure seemed to enjoy representing San Diego baseball. Very Happy


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dodgerblue6



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PostPosted: Wed 9/28/11 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

70 years ago today:

On September 28, 1941, Ted Williams became the last player to hit .400.

(from This Day in History email)

On this day in 1941, the Boston Red Sox's Ted Williams plays a double- header against the Philadelphia Athletics on the last day of the regular season and gets six hits in eight trips to the plate, to boost his batting average to .406 and become the first player since Bill Terry in 1930 to hit .400.

Williams, who spent his entire career with the Sox, played his final game exactly 19 years later, on September 28, 1960, at Boston's Fenway Park and hit a home run in his last time at bat, for a career total of 521 home runs.

1941 marked Williams' best season. In addition to his .406 batting average--no major league player since him has hit .400--the left fielder led the league with 37 homers, 135 runs and had a slugging average of .735. Also that season, Williams had an on-base percentage of .553, a record that remained unbroken for 61 years, until Barry Bonds achieved a percentage of .582 in 2002.

(Note: In 1942, Williams won the American League Triple Crown.)
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Last edited by dodgerblue6 on Mon 10/3/11 4:51 pm; edited 1 time in total
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sunnyblue



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PostPosted: Thu 9/29/11 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That was a good post. I believe I've heard it told that he was given the chance of sitting out a game to protect his average and said true to form something to the tune of "hell no." The greatest player to ever play the game who didn't win a World series.
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dodgerblue6



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PostPosted: Sat 10/1/11 11:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

OMG...I am salivating already!!!

The Ted Williams collection is going on display at the S.D. Hall of Champions for the month of October before items will be auctioned off. I must get there!!! Anyone want to go and join me? At least now my life is settling down a bit from three weeks of craziness. Will post more on that later.

From the San Diego Union-Tribune:

Quote:
Hunt Auctions, based in Exton, Pa., will handle the selling of Williams’ memorabilia. Company President John Hunt said Williams’ collection will earn “a significant amount of money, well into multiple six figures.”

...Williams finished his career with 521 home runs, despite missing three full seasons and the majority of two more seasons in the prime of his career while serving as a Navy flight instructor during World War II and later flying more than 30 missions during the Korean conflict.

Williams’ military record adds to his lore. Among the items to be displayed at the Hall of Champions will be one of his aviator manuals, complete with Williams’ handwritten logs.

He won six batting titles, including the last in 1958 when he was 40, making Williams the oldest player to win a batting title. Of the 24 players to hit 500 or more home runs, Williams owns the highest lifetime batting average, .344.

...“We are honored to be involved with Ted Williams and his family,” Hunt said. “Claudia wanted his collection to be seen by fans who can’t attend the auction. And she wanted them to be seen first in San Diego, his hometown.”

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forloveofthegame



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PostPosted: Sat 10/1/11 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We'll probably work it in sometime when we're in Balboa Park. We like to get down there and enjoy the park at least a couple of weekends a month. During the offseason, it gives us something else to do, lol. If we're planning to go, we will let you know. I agree it sounds like a great way to showcase these prized items! Glad they're here first so we can all get a glimpse. Thank you to Claudia for arranging that!
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sunnyblue



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PostPosted: Sun 10/2/11 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would love to. Don't plan on me right away as I'm not sure when I'll be in the city again for an extended time. I will make sure to before the end of October, though.
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dodgerblue6



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PostPosted: Tue 10/4/11 1:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, I told Harpo about it, so let's see if I can get him out to see this.

Back to the last day of the 1941 season...here's a great article from the L.A. Times about the integrity Williams displayed in that situation and a comparison to a similar situation that took place 70 years later, to the date. It illustrates precisely what you posted last week, Sunnyblue.

"Ted Williams' way of earning a batting title"

Seventy years ago, the Splendid Splinter finished with a .406 average by starring in a doubleheader he could have skipped. Contrast that with the new NL batting king's tactic.


By Bill Dwyre

September 29, 2011

One wonders if Jose Reyes would understand the juxtaposition of what he did Wednesday.

One also wonders if there could be any better illustration of the difference between sports stars of the past and of today.

Reyes started for the New York Mets, collected a bunt single and sat down for the rest of the game. He hoped his one-for-one day would boost him to a National League batting title, which it did. Going to the plate for the rest of the game would have endangered that.

Seventy years ago Wednesday, Sept. 28, 1941, Ted Williams confronted a similar situation, only much more historic in scope. The Splendid Splinter, a 23-year-old in his third year with the Boston Red Sox, entered the final two games of the regular season, a doubleheader, with a .3996 average. If he sat it out the rest of the way, as his manager Joe Cronin suggested, they would round his average off to .400.

Williams decided to play, saying, "If I can't hit .400 all the way, I don't deserve it."

Williams went six for eight, including a home run and a double. He ended up with a .406 average. Exactly 70 years have passed, and nobody has hit .400. It is both a baseball milestone and a monument to one of the greatest hitters ever.

Williams wasn't even Most Valuable Player of the league that year. The New York Yankees won the pennant going away and they had some guy who hit safely in 56 straight games.

"Hell, I'd have even voted for DiMaggio," Williams said years later.

Reyes' decision only adds to the need to commemorate Williams on the anniversary of his famous .406. There have been personalities in sports over the years and are plenty now. But there was only one Teddy Ballgame, a snarly, big-hearted contradiction.

A sports column can't capture him. He is a book, and that was exactly the conclusion of former Sports Illustrated writer John Underwood in 2002, when Williams died at 83. Underwood had become Williams' friend, a status not easily achieved from the crotchety Williams. His decades-long access resulted in a wonderfully readable little book that still sits in the darkened corners of some bookstores.

It is called "It's Only Me."

"He kind of talked out of the side of his mouth," Underwood said. "He'd call on the phone and that's what he'd say when you answered: 'It's only me.'"

Underwood describes a man who loved life and was tortured by it.

"He had abysmal downs and herculean ups," Underwood said. "There was a greatness there, but he just didn't understand himself. He was quirky, like your favorite eccentric uncle."

Underwood had talked Williams into going fishing with him for an SI story, and their mutual love of the outdoors led to more excursions, even to Africa. That access has Underwood writing a screenplay, with the usual hopes that a Hollywood producer will wander by.

The problem is, they may have already made the movie. In "The Natural," the hero, Robert Redford's Roy Hobbs, batted third in the lineup, wore No. 9, and, in his last at-bat, smashed a row of lights with a towering home run. Williams broke a loudspeaker horn with a double on his last day in 1941, and also homered in his last at-bat in 1960.

The famous line in the movie is when Hobbs is asked what he wants to accomplish, and says, "When I walk down the street, people will say, 'There goes Roy Hobbs, the best there ever was.'" Williams was fond of saying, "All I care about is when I walk down the street, people will know I was the greatest hitter ever."

Younger generations may not be able to comprehend the likes of Ted Williams. He missed five summers of prime career because he served as a fighter pilot in both World War II and Korea. In Korea, he crash-landed his damaged plane. It came in at 225 mph, slid for a mile and exploded in flame seconds after he jumped out and rolled away.

He complained little about his military service, always tempering those discussions with his understanding of the need to serve and protect. Underwood said that Williams once told his son, "The best team I ever played for was the Marines."

He hated most of the Boston writers and they him. It was an era when there were as many as a half-dozen daily papers in the city, all competing for scoops, and Williams was the daily whipping boy. That makes his friendship with Underwood even stranger.

Williams was a world-class fisherman and hunter. He is in baseball's Hall of Fame and the International Game Fishing Assn. Hall of Fame. Among his catches: a 1,250-pound marlin and a 500-pound thresher shark.

He was married and divorced three times, and when he died, two of his children had his body frozen.

Underwood said that his last conversation with Williams was a few weeks before he died.

"When he came to the phone, it sounded like somebody who wasn't Ted Williams. He said, 'If I had to have this year over to keep all the other ones, I wouldn't.'"

Ted Williams' 1941 is a keeper. He had 185 hits, 147 walks, struck out 27 times and had a .553 on-base percentage. In his record-setting streak, DiMaggio hit .408. In that same span, Williams hit .412.

In those days, sacrifice flies counted as at-bats. Williams, slow of foot, had just three infield hits. The longest spell he went without a hit was seven at-bats.

Sounds like numbers that would make even Jose Reyes proud.

bill.dwyre@latimes.com


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Well, I learned something about official at-bats from the last few sentences of this article.

Great read--highly recommended for baseball fans everywhere.
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forloveofthegame



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PostPosted: Tue 10/4/11 6:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a good article that was. Thanks.

Has anyone here ever read the book Teammates? I thought I skimmed the Book thread once but it was pretty long and I don't know if I got to everything. If not, it is very highly recommended by me.

One thing I always admired about him was he held everyone to his high standards, and he didn't care how nice a guy you were if you couldn't hang tough. Of course nobody after him hit as well as he did in his career, but he still felt there was no room for lowering the bar. He thought higher expectations were important and even if you were good, you could be better. He really had to push to make himself better than the best. I guess that would be what playing against Joe DiMaggio so much could do!

That kind of integrity on the field is not easy to come by anymore as this article you posted shows.
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sunnyblue



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PostPosted: Wed 10/5/11 6:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've read it - it's a good one.

Quote:
One thing I always admired about him was he held everyone to his high standards, and he didn't care how nice a guy you were if you couldn't hang tough. Of course nobody after him hit as well as he did in his career, but he still felt there was no room for lowering the bar. He thought higher expectations were important and even if you were good, you could be better. He really had to push to make himself better than the best. I guess that would be what playing against Joe DiMaggio so much could do!

That kind of integrity on the field is not easy to come by anymore as this article you posted shows.


Very well stated & I agree! I feel very privileged to have met him back in the 1990's.
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sunnyblue



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PostPosted: Tue 10/11/11 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay - my brother said it is not to be missed! He was down there a couple of days ago and has met many baseball fans from other parts of the country who have come in to see this exhibit.
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forloveofthegame



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PostPosted: Wed 10/12/11 6:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, we're aiming for this weekend. Thanks for that report.

We were talking about it the other day, and someone mentioned that wasn't it Claudia who sued the Hall of Champions several years ago? How did they reconcile that she's sharing this collection now, I wonder.
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dodgerblue6



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PostPosted: Sat 10/15/11 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is a good question!--I'd forgotten all about it.

You'll notice I started a thread about it five years ago, but never updated it. What's even stranger is...I can't find anything on-line to substantiate what actually happened!--just a lot of articles from 2006 referencing the lawsuit being filed.

Here's the recent announcement from SDHOC. I'm targeting next Sunday, the first true day off I'll have had in quite awhile, as the date I'm setting aside for this.

Still puzzled about how this story fell off the radar and what could have happened--and I'm planning to follow up on it.
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sunnyblue



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PostPosted: Tue 10/18/11 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is odd. I don't even remember that happening. Let us know what you find out.

I do have to say from my trips to Cooperstown, one thing I remember is what high regard everyone there holds for Teddy Ballgame. He was outspoken to be sure, but he is so highly respected!

To Cathy, I did read the book Teammates and enjoyed it very much.
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dodgerblue6



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PostPosted: Thu 10/20/11 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I do have to say from my trips to Cooperstown, one thing I remember is what high regard everyone there holds for Teddy Ballgame. He was outspoken to be sure, but he is so highly respected!


Sunnyblue, that is so true! And I have always loved hearing Vin weave in a story about him during a broadcast. Even though he never called games he played in, he saw him play so much he was clearly in awe.

Anyway...I just had to share this because it's one of the best things I've read in a long time. Vin himself has mentioned this piece by John Updike and no doubt the two are in the same class.

From Chris Erskine's column in the Times yesterday (note Erskine has a sense of humor): Smile

"This is baseball writing that soars out of the park"

John Updike's essay on Ted Williams' final home run is still a walk-off hit.

By Chris Erskine

October 18, 2011, 6:32 p.m.

Be it said that the people who love good baseball are also drawn to good writing, though the cruciferous goons you encounter in the bleachers each summer do their best to convince us otherwise.

Yet, I think there are commonalities between the two, baseball and writing: wisdom, surprise, resonance, wit. I lack many of them, but as with the Supreme Court and pornography, I know it when I download it.

Fenway Park, in Boston, is a lyric little bandbox of a ballpark. Everything is painted green and seems in curiously sharp focus, like the inside of an old-fashioned peeping-type Easter egg. It was built in 1912 and rebuilt in 1934, and offers, as do most Boston artifacts, a compromise between Man's Euclidean determinations and Nature's beguiling irregularities. Its right field is one of the deepest in the American League, while its left field is the shortest; the high left-field wall, three hundred and fifteen feet from home plate along the foul line, virtually thrusts its surface at right-handed hitters. On the afternoon of Wednesday, September 28, as I took a seat behind third base, a uniformed groundkeeper was treading the top of this wall, picking batting-practice home runs out of the screen, like a mushroom gatherer seen in Wordsworthian perspective on the verge of a cliff....


That's John Updike, from his 1960 piece on the retirement of Ted Williams. Nice chuck of writing. Here's more.

The affair between Boston and Ted Williams has been no mere summer romance; it has been a marriage, composed of spats, mutual disappointments, and, toward the end, a mellowing hoard of shared memories. It falls into three stages, which may be termed Youth, Maturity, and Age; or Thesis, Antithesis, and Synthesis; or Jason, Achilles, and Nestor.

I can't recall whom Nestor played for … might've been the Braves. And I'm so shallow that for years I thought "The Dirty Dozen" was a comedy.

But Updike's references still aren't wasted on a relative yokel like me.

Yep, to say Updike could write a little would be like saying that Williams was pretty good with a stick. When Updike was "on," as he is here, you could almost dance to the stuff.

The essay, a New Yorker piece dubbed "Hub Fans Bid Kid Adieu," is the finest piece on baseball I've ever read — Updike at peak form detailing the last Fenway at-bat of the best hitter who ever played. If you've read it before, you know what I'm saying. If not, stay tuned.

The best baseball fiction I ever read was "Shoeless Joe," the W.P. Kinsella novel that became a little movie you may have heard of, "Field of Dreams."

The best non-fiction was Roger Kahn's "Boys of Summer." To understand the difference between a high school hack and a genuine Major Leaguer, read the chapter where George Shuba gives Kahn a batting lesson in his basement.

"Level and swift, the bat parted the air and made a whining sound. Again Shuba swung again and again, controlled and terribly hard. It was the hardest swing I ever saw that close."

And the best essay? Well, this one by Updike, which felt like a good thing to share, some 50 years later, acorns underfoot, a World Series at our doorstep.

So, while I go to pour another cider and watch the idiots in the stands fuss with their stupid smartphones, warm your hands on what a real baseball fan had to say about the human drama right in front of him — the Splendid Splinter's final hit:

...Williams swung again, and there it was. The ball climbed on a diagonal line into the vast volume of air over center field. From my angle, behind third base, the ball seemed less an object in flight than the tip of a towering, motionless construct, like the Eiffel Tower or the Tappan Zee Bridge. It was in the books while it was still in the sky. [Oriole center fielder Jackie] Brandt ran back to the deepest corner of the outfield grass; the ball descended beyond his reach and struck in the crotch where the bullpen met the wall, bounced chunkily, and, as far as I could see, vanished.

Like a feather caught in a vortex, Williams ran around the square of bases at the center of our beseeching screaming. He ran as he always ran out home runs — hurriedly, unsmiling, head down, as if our praise were a storm of rain to get out of. He didn't tip his cap. Though we thumped, wept, and chanted "We want Ted" for minutes after he hid in the dugout, he did not come back. Our noise for some seconds passed beyond excitement into a kind of immense open anguish, a wailing, a cry to be saved. But immortality is nontransferable. The papers said that the other players, and even the umpires on the field, begged him to come out and acknowledge us in some way, but he never had and did not now. Gods do not answer letters.


chris.erskine@latimes.com
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forloveofthegame



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PostPosted: Thu 10/20/11 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent - thank you for posting! I too can vouch for the fact he is deeply respected from Cooperstown, all the way back home to San Diego. And for many very good reasons.
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sunnyblue



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PostPosted: Fri 10/21/11 5:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very nice & thanks for that column by Chris.
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forloveofthegame



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PostPosted: Fri 10/21/11 10:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We finally went! And it was worth the time spent. Kind of like oohing and aahing and putting you in a state of awe, and Linda, you will love it. I dared my husband to ask the museum guide what happened with the lawsuit but he refused to Laughing and I did not have the nerve to, myself.
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dodgerblue6



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PostPosted: Sat 10/22/11 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LOL Wink
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sunnyblue



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PostPosted: Sun 10/23/11 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Congratulations DB! DB has had her article in the HOC newsletter.
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forloveofthegame



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PostPosted: Tue 10/25/11 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Outstanding Linda! I know you have gotten down on yourself from time to time but please know your work is appreciated here! What better subject to be recognized for writing about but the greatest hitter of all time?
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PostPosted: Tue 10/25/11 7:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes Linda, I agree with Sunnyblue and Forloveofthegame. You deserve to be recognized for your wonderful writing style and how you bring baseball and it's great players to life Smile

Congratulations Very Happy
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PostPosted: Tue 10/25/11 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DITTO
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dodgerblue6



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PostPosted: Wed 10/26/11 7:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aw, thanks, everyone! Appreciate the support.

I'd like it to be more about the topic than about me, though. I'm with Cathy, what better subject than the greatest of all-time?
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forloveofthegame



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PostPosted: Sat 4/28/12 2:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It has been a few months but I am happy to bump this thread back up for some good news.

A friend my husband and I met through the Ted Williams chapter of SABR is a New England transplant who lived in Boston in the ‘40’s, ’50’s and ‘60’s but moved to San Diego in 1974. His name is Fred. He was very active with the Jimmy Fund back there, and is very supportive of the Padres’ charities here. He shared some information with us. We thought it would be a good thing for the Hall of Champions to have some of this on hand about it and maybe call attention to athletes working for a cause.

The Splinter was one of the first athletes to be associated with something like this and I am sure some of the things that happened during his childhood gave him a soft spot in his heart for these children. I know both Linda and I have shared a lot before about what Ted had done with the Jimmy Fund. But this is now taking on a different meaning because someone I know personally was affected by it, closely and not in a distant way. So even though it is a topic raised before, I wanted to share the story and give more details.

Our friend’s son Steve died in the early 1960s at age 11, but to this day his dad (Fred) says he will never forget Williams’ devotion to the children served by the Jimmy Fund. He is forever thankful for what this baseball great did not just for his own son but for thousands of others over the years. He would like to get a lot of them together to share their stories and is already doing that.

We are in the process of working with the Hall of Champions to see what can be done with this exhibit. One of Fred’s contacts who is helping us has asked me if I would like to be a main contact person to work with this. My son has expressed interest in it too as he is doing community work on several projects and he loves baseball history, so it would be perfect for him. He has been a member of the Kids Club of the Hall of Champions since he was small.

The article really made me cry. When I think of all the people Ted Williams has inspired off the ball field as well as on it, it is just remarkable for lack of a better word. It was written and posted on the Harvard University website.

I was very impressed that the countless appearances were not just appearances but they came from his heart. It is clear how much he loved the children and all he did to make their lives better.

I know we have talked a lot about what a great player he was, what a great war hero he was. Even though some things have been posted already about his community involvement it is now time to share more about this from a personal angle of a friend and others he knew.

I think it is terrible that the press picked him apart even as a rookie before he got a chance to prove himself. I know Linda mentioned this in her article last year, but the fans booed him mercilessly on and off throughout his career and then having the nerve to complain he did not acknowledge them toward the end. Unbelievable. Fred says those who tried to tear him down only made him more determined to prove himself. I am sure the children were the only ones who treated him like a hero because it was not the press or the fans, not during his playing days. Again I apologize because I know some of this is repeated from before.

I am also proud of his work with Tony Gwynn and of course his days as a Padre, but I wanted to post about this in particular because even though it has been talked about a lot here on this board, it does not get mentioned in general.

This project is just in the early stages but if we get this added to the exhibit at the Hall of Champions by summer, it would be wonderful if Gil Hodges fan will be able to see it with us! Hall of Champions is just a mile or so from Petco Park so very easy to get to, in Balboa Park.

Here is the article discussing the personal stories
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GilHodgesFan



Joined: 15 Jan 2011
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Location: Cedar Rapids Iowa

PostPosted: Sat 4/28/12 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a wonderful opportunity for you Forloveofthegame Very Happy I know how much you love Ted Williams and to promote what he did for for the Jimmy Fund would be dear to your heart. He seems to have had a real soft-spot for children. I would definitely love to see the Hall of Champions while we are in San Diego Smile
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dodgerblue6



Joined: 10 Aug 2005
Posts: 19325
Location: San Diego CA - deep in the heart of SoCal

PostPosted: Tue 5/1/12 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Despite six batting titles and four home run championships, Williams always said he was proudest of his military service in World War II and Korea and his work for the Jimmy Fund.


Now there is someone who had his priorities straight!

Thanks for the post and link. I especially enjoyed these excerpts (bold highlights mine):

Quote:
Williams would travel everywhere and anywhere, no strings or paychecks attached, to support the cause — Little League games, American Legion banquets, houses of worship, department stores for autograph sessions, even cookouts on Boston Common.

Although some of these trips were publicized by the media, he insisted that the numerous visits he made to children in the Jimmy Fund Clinic and Children's Hospital Boston be kept out of the newspapers.

After the Jimmy Fund/ Variety Club Theatre Collections Program began in 1949, Williams helped assure that canisters passed among movie audiences were filled by venturing to theaters and drive-ins and speaking to audiences himself. He was also among the early celebrities to appear in a trailer film for the program, which remains the charity's longest- running annual fundraiser.

Williams' single greatest day of work for the Institute may have been on Aug. 17, 1953, shortly after his return from a stint as a Marine combat pilot in the Korean War.

Approached about being the guest of honor at a "Welcome Home, Ted" dinner, he told then-Jimmy Fund Chairman Bill Koster: "If you make it make it $100-a-plate [the equivalent of $2,500 today], with the proviso that everybody, and I mean everybody, has to pay, and all the proceeds go to the Jimmy Fund, I'll be there."

...Elected an Honorary Trustee for Life at Dana-Farber in 1954 and a Jimmy Fund general chairman two years later, Williams spent these same years routinely making unsolicited visits to the bedsides of young Dana-Farber patients. Tales abound of kids waking up to find "the Kid" standing over them, or parents learning at check-out time that "Mr. Williams has taken care of your bill."

It is well documented that Williams hit a home run in his final major league at-bat in 1960, but a far lesser-known story is that after the previous day's game, he had gone to visit a sick boy at the Jimmy Fund Clinic and then driven to Rhode Island for four separate Jimmy Fund appearances. The boy, who was able to give Williams a belt he had made for him, died a few days later.

...In 1995, for instance, Dana-Farber started a giving club bearing Williams' name to support basic and clinical research in pediatric oncology. Dubbed the Ted Williams 406 Club — in honor of the slugger's since-unmatched 1941 batting average of .406 — the club raised more than $2 million to fund a member of the Pediatric Oncology staff working as the Ted Williams Senior Investigator.

"To me, Ted Williams was a role model of sorts, a man of enormous focus and dedication," says Alan D'Andrea, MD, the current Williams Investigator. "He was a guy who practiced hitting until his blisters bled, and then practiced some more. As a scientist, I try to bring at least some of this intensity to the research laboratory every day."


If his approach to hitting inspires a doctor who can do so much more good, his legacy is even greater than I thought.
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forloveofthegame



Joined: 23 Oct 2009
Posts: 7040
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PostPosted: Wed 5/2/12 1:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is good to know Gil Hodges fan. Smile

Linda -

Quote:
If his approach to hitting inspires a doctor who can do so much more good, his legacy is even greater than I thought.


That is a wonderful thought. This summer we are coming up on the 10th anniversary of his death and I like to think of what his legacy was other than just being the greatest hitter of all time - & also a great veteran who fought for our country. There are so many great things he did in his life.
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